• 0

In the world of automobiles, getting stuck with a lemon is the worst possible scenario, but in turn-of-the-century Carpinteria, lemons often led to highly fortuitous scenarios. Sim Shepard planted the first lemon orchard in Carpinteria around 1880, according to a 1968 article by Albertine Ro…

  • 0

With the 32nd Annual California Avocado Festival on deck this weekend, it’s difficult to imagine a time before Carpinteria Valley fell in love with the avocado. But the valley’s rich soil has nurtured the roots of many major agricultural products, from beans to lemons to walnuts.

  • 0

Just as Carpinteria embraces its small town charm, it has long embraced its newspapers. The first newspaper inked with the local goings on was the Carpinteria Courier, which was published out of Summerland for at least some of its late-1800s history.

  • 0

On Sept. 21, 1965, after months of passionate debate and political polarization, Carpinterians voted 895 to 635 to form a new city out of the unincorporated town of Carpinteria. The young city encompassed 0.8 square miles and boasted a population of 6,651 residents. The first City Council se…

  • 0

In 1893, seeking loftier discussions than those of Lima beans and artesian water, the ladies of Carpinteria Valley created a woman’s club. The concept originated with Belle Oglesby Franklin, who went door to door calling on her friends and neighbors and inviting them to participate in her ne…

  • 0

In 1893, seeking loftier discussions than those of lima beans and artesian water, the ladies of Carpinteria Valley created a woman’s club. The concept originated with Belle Oglesby Franklin, who went door to door calling on her friends and neighbors and inviting them to participate in her ne…

  • 0

The Lescher family home, with its decorative gables and two-storied porch, offered a comfortable-yet-elegant residence for a 19th century family in the untamed Carpinteria Valley. The home was located northeast of Casitas Pass and Foothill roads, and between its walls, little Ada Lescher com…

  • 0

In 1966, The Carpinteria Herald reported that Carpinteria had been listed in The Los Angeles Times as one of 25 key Southern California cities in terms of opportunity for growth and strategic location. The little town’s population of 6,688 was expected to boom to well over 20,000 by the year…

  • 0

In August of 1967, Carpinteria’s Youth Council organized an all-day festival of beach competitions for local teens, giving the youth a chance to shake off their beach energy before returning to the classroom. Some of the festival winners from 40-plus years ago are still in Carpinteria today.

  • 0

When August hits, the novelty of summer is gone for many school kids and the boredom plague has begun to spread. The high of freedom inevitably wears off and kids must get creative to stay active and busy. More than 30 years ago, a Carpinteria Herald photographer captured nine locals filling…

  • 0

Brimming with energy, ideas and ambition, P.C. Higgins played an integral role in Carpinteria’s history. “Mr. Higgins is one of the most progressive citizens in the valley, and is the first and foremost in all matters looking to its permanent betterment,” stated an article published in a spe…

  • 0

Ground broke for a new Carpinteria Boys Club site on Foothill Road on Aug. 1, 1973 after a grant from Santa Barbara Foundation provided the funding to move the club out of an Aliso School classroom and into its own facility. Newly hired director, Rich Medel, worked out of a real estate offic…

  • 0

Standing in just the right spot on Linden Avenue, equidistant are both of Carpinteria’s unchangeable natural treasures—the mountains and the sea.

  • 0

Traffic on Highway 101 can drive a person insane. But there are thanks to give for all the rounds of improvements that have brought the 101 to its current state. Imagine today’s commuters on the highway of 100 years ago, which we now know as Carpinteria Avenue and which is shown above near t…

  • 0

By the 1930s and ‘40s, America’s love affair with the automobile was in full swing. Most families had at least one car and used vehicles to make the long trip to Santa Barbara and get around sprawling, rural Carpinteria Valley. Despite the car’s ubiquity, few teens owned their own—most had t…

  • 0

In 1939, Reginald Treloar Ogan composed a term paper titled “Mountain-Seashore, at your Door,” in which he wrote about the history of Carpinteria and described in detail the state of the 3,300-person town in the late 1930s. Born and raised in Carpinteria behind a long line of relatives with …

  • 0

The Linden Avenue of 1918 is a far cry from the Linden Avenue of 2018. Instead of the hustle and bustle of tourists and locals driving, bicycling and walking from here to there, we see a lone auto in the distance with a horse nearby. Instead of shops and restaurants rubbing elbows from Carpi…

  • 0

Before there were Albertsons and CVS at Casitas Plaza, there were Thrifty and Jordanos. And before the brick and mortar of those two retail outlets, there was the artist’s representation of Casitas Plaza, drawn from the perspective of Starbuck’s patio. This drawing is from page four of the A…

  • 0

In 1913, Carpinteria experienced two historic additions into its academic fabric: the unification of the school district and the opening of the city’s first high school.

  • 0

Although most legal matters today are directed to the county’s court facilities in Santa Barbara, court cases nearly 100 years ago were held in a small room beneath the city’s water tank building.

  • 0

Though the remains of the preserved adobe structure at Heath Ranch Adobe Park may be small, the former estate was one of the most impressive Carpinteria residences in the nineteenth century, once belonging to a respected farmer and attorney.

  • 0

Long before the days of breakfast burritos and b-egg-l’s, bills and banking were the specialties of several financial institutions over the years at 5050 Carpinteria Ave., current home to Jack’s Famous Bagels.

  • 0

The Coast Highway at Linden Avenue looking west, circa 1947, epitomized small town charm. The water tank on the right held the town’s water supply and proclaimed, “Carpinteria—World’s Safest Beach.” Another sign with the same slogan can be seen just beyond the Standard Gasoline Station in th…

  • 0

Long before the days of enlightened animal care, the Alcazar Theatre on Carpinteria Avenue had a visit from the MGM lion, safely ensconced in a circus wagon. The circa 1928–29 photo shows Romance/Rio Grande on the theater marquee and a crowd of people surrounding the caged feline.

  • 0

The Cerca del Mar clubhouse, forever linked to Carpinteria history as the community social hall, was demolished in the early 1970s, nearly 40 years after financial ruin forced the closure of the once-popular beachfront gathering spot. Its pier also met a premature end when 40 years ago this …

  • 0

The former Fish Seed Company packinghouse was one of the region’s leaders in the seed and bean industry. Built in 1910 by Henry Fish, the building, once located at the foot of Palm Avenue, handled more than 20 varieties of seed beans.

  • 0

Whenever the “Summer of Love” is mentioned, images of a late-1960s, year-round sunshiny California are often conjured up; a warm, West Coast retreat that embodied a peaceful attitude and a musical revolution largely associated with the San Francisco Bay Area. For Carpinterians, however, Dece…

  • 0

For millions of Americans, spring means baseball. At Carpinteria High School, baseball excitement is just starting to pick up as the page turns on the soccer season’s phenomenal finish. Coaching the current team is Pat Cooney, son-in-law of longtime coach Lou Panizzon, who is pictured above …

  • 0

In 1934, The Carpinteria Chronicle, a short-lived local publication, printed a map depicting the young town of Carpinteria in the 1880s. The little seaside enclave stretches only as far northeast as today’s Carpinteria Avenue, referred to on the map as “Overland Route to Los Angeles.” While …

  • 0

Johnston Fruit Company lemon pickers, ca. 1930s, display their harvest. The lemon was the backbone of Carpinteria’s economy for much of the first half of the 20th century. Fortunes were built on the tangy crop, and many families put food on the table thanks to the fruit’s demand across the country.

  • 0

Keeping Carpinteria and Summerland safe from fires in 1957 were, from left, William Jacobs, Jack Thompson, Gene Pozzebon, Carrol Boyd, Gene Careaga, Frank Floyd, Robert Olivas, Robert Kanapeaux, Richard Crume, Daniel Moyer and Nicholas Razo.

  • 0

Carpinteria’s fall and winter of 2017/2018 have played out similarly to the fall and winter of 1971/1972. The October, 1971 Romero Fire burned much of the same terrain around Carpinteria Valley as last December’s Thomas Fire. And on the heels of both fires came significant flooding—though 19…

  • 0

In preparation for an overdue remodel to City Hall, the City of Carpinteria plans to relocate temporarily later this year. Now with dozens of employees on payroll, the 53-year-old city long ago outgrew its original home, pictured above. The little building at 4859 Carpinteria Ave. that first…

  • 0

CVN reader Melissa Fowler called the newspaper office after last week’s paper hit the stands. The longtime Carpinterian questioned the accuracy of the date CVN printed with last week’s Throwback Thursday photo of flooding. She clearly remembered the flood of 1969, but last week’s Santa Barba…

  • 0

Carrie Bonior Edwards, pictured above at right with her friend Dana Nigh, dug up this 1971 Santa Barbara News-Press photo after she heard about the post-Thomas Fire flooding in her hometown. Now a resident of Washington State, the 1978 Carpinteria High School graduate said she doesn’t rememb…

  • 0

Since last week’s storm, city and county officials have been singing the praises of the flood control channels built along Franklin and Santa Monica creeks. Those structures came in response to the local flood of 1969 that caused extensive damage throughout the valley. Carpinteria High Schoo…

  • 0

The flood of 1914 left Old Town Carpinteria (this photo taken near Reynolds Avenue) mired in mud and water, but the homes that remained standing belonged to the lucky locals—some buildings were swept away entirely.

  • 0

As Carpinteria parents wade through the fifth week without school, many pine for the good old days before the Thomas Fire and winter break ganged up on the regular routine. This quintet of Rincon School students offers a glimpse at the really old days—the school days of 1898 to be specific. …

  • 0

Fire suppression over the last several decades has given the Thomas Fire much to chew on this week. The last fire to hit the hills behind Carpinteria in recent history was the Romero Fire in 1971. It burned 160,000 acres over the course of 10 days. The fire, which destroyed four homes, injur…

  • 0

During the holiday season of 1936, The Carpinteria Herald ran a number of Christmas themed items. The following snippet of life in Carpinteria 81 years ago appeared in the Dec. 25 edition:

  • 0

The little stars of the Carpinteria Head Start program charm the crowd during the 1977 holiday parade. Next weekend, Carpinterians of all ages will costume up for the Holiday Parade along Linden Avenue. To check out the action, find a good spot on the curb between 6th Street and Carpinteria …

  • 0

Remember when there was no Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf on the corner? Remember when parades went down Carpinteria Avenue? Here’s the proof. These days the route has changed, along with some of the scenery, but Carpinteria still puts on a parade with music, dance and costumes every December. T…

  • 0

The Ota family history is closely intertwined with that of the Bates family, which Throwback Thursday has spotlighted for the last several weeks. Like the Ramirezes, who were featured recently, the Otas got their start in local farming on the 1,200-acre ranch owned by R.W. Bates.

  • 0

This photo was taken when the Bates family owned the Ventura County side of Rincon Point, and 1,200 acres up the canyon. Just a handful of structures existed south of the two-lane highway, in an area that’s now cheek-to-jowl with multi-million dollar homes and crawling with surfers from up a…

  • 0

During World War II, when fear of a Japanese attack plagued the West Coast, Carpinteria hosted a squadron of Army soldiers who manned a pair of tactical guns perched above Rincon Point. And so, the tales of Bates Ranch continue.

  • 0

Bates Ranch shaped numerous family histories, many of which never shared a drop of Bates blood. Among these was the Ramirez family. Fernando Ramirez (pictured on a horse with his young nephew Joe Velasquez) spent most of his life as the ranch foreman and meant so much to his employer, R.W. B…

  • 0

Bates Ranch shaped numerous family histories, many of which never shared a drop of Bates blood. Among these was the Ramirez family. Fernando Ramirez (pictured above on a horse with his young nephew Joe Velasquez and his dog among the ranch irrigation pipes) spent most of his life as the ranc…

  • 0

The tiny town of La Conchita had about a dozen families living there by 1930. Lima beans grew on both sides of the little hamlet, but fresh water had to be hauled in. The Matilija Water Company delivered to residents, selling 5-gallon jugs for 25 cents. A handful of cottages sat on the beach…

  • 0

The Ramirez family carved out a unique niche of local history when they arrived by boxcar in 1911. Southern Pacific Railroad had hired Cipriano Ramirez as a laborer in El Paso, Texas in 1910 soon after he and his wife, Huventina, had emigrated from Mexico. The company moved the Ramirezes out…

  • 0

El Sereno Motel at 3250 Via Real once offered pleasant accommodations for travelers passing through town or stopping over for a polo match at the adjacent Santa Barbara Polo and Racquet Club. Years ago, the motel was converted into apartments, and now the property is targeted for a residenti…

We're always interested in hearing about news in our community. Let us know what's going on!