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Carpinteria boasts a ripe history of aviation, and much of it can be attributed to the high-flying, boundary-pushing Bauhaus family. William Bauhaus unfortunately fell victim to his love of flight. He was a passenger in the plane pictured when it fell from the sky and buried its engine four …

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Carpinteria’s Stanley Park offered a rustic-yet-comfortable escape from the city along the banks of Rincon Creek. Located upstream of where Highway 150 and Gobernador Canyon Road intersect today, the resort, complete with craftsman-style lodge, dining room and tent cabins, was developed by D…

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As things go, it wasn’t exactly the crime of the century. But when Steve Bissell (b. 1947) and a friend drove up the big hill behind Rincon Point in February 1973, ignoring a few “No Trespassing” signs along the way, the resulting masterpiece became a crucial element – the defining photograp…

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The notes on this photo speak for themselves, but it’s worth adding that the 1938 team was led by Carpinteria High School Hall of Famers Phil Olds and Gordon Milne, who were honored as Most Valuable Back and Most Valuable Lineman, respectively. Lou Panizzon, longtime coach, educator and CVN-…

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The Carpinteria Woman’s Club holds a tree planting ceremony circa 1925 on the property that would hold the clubhouse a few years down the road. Paid for in full as of Jan. 3, 1924, the $1,300 land at 1059 Vallecito Road has now been held by the club for over nearly 100 years. Master carpente…

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This story, like many from my childhood in Carpinteria, begins and ends on 8th Street. Bob Franco, my lifelong friend, also grew up on 8th Street. After school, we would sometimes go to Bob’s grandmother’s house to visit and have an afternoon snack. The Franco family moved to the United Stat…

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A new exhibition at Santa Barbara Maritime Museum (SBMM) is currently exploring the intersection between surfing and art. The show also provides a great chance to bone up on California surf history. And best of all, the exhibit pays proper attention to our own Rincon Point as one of the worl…

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If the avenue on the east end of town doesn’t prove it, this photo certainly does. The Bailard family has called Carpinteria home for a very long time. The name is partly cut off by the photo’s edge, but it appears the shop depicted above was a Bailard-owned general merchandise store at a ti…

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The corner of Linden and Carpinteria avenues was once the go-to spot for a new harness and shoes for one’s primary mode of transportation. Coast Road, now Carpinteria Avenue, led travelers up and down the coastline, where, to the west, Summerland offered Spiritualist meetings. A turn north o…

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The Daylight train headed for Los Angeles chugs through the Carpinteria station in 1954. Carpinteria saw its first train come to town on Aug. 19, 1887. In the early days of train service, a tug on the cord prompted the engineer to stop anywhere along the route. Pick ups happened along the wa…

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“Listen, Gidget,” he said with a big smirk, “there are other things than surf-riding, praise the Lord.” 

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In the 1840s, a young Russel Heath came down with gold fever and joined the masses of young men who journeyed to California to strike it rich. Gold mining never paid off substantially for the New York native, but he did amass wealth and respect as one of the early American settlers of Carpinteria. 

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Early automobile drives along the California Coast Highway led across the same bridge over Rincon Creek that motorists cross today. Now the Bates Road route sees mostly local traffic while Highway 101 serves as the main people-moving artery. 

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The word Rincon commonly pops up in business names in Carpinteria. Back in 1915, when Rincon Garage was built and opened, it was used in reference to the brand new wooden causeway connecting Carpinteria to Ventura along the coast. The garage was located on the eastside of Linden Avenue where…

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Scores of Carpinteria High School commencement ceremonies have taken place where a muddy pool appears in this photo. The school’s amphitheater was constructed alongside the rest of the Foothill Road school in the late 1960s, but a 1969 storm that caused extensive damage throughout the new ca…

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A well-worn scrapbook of photographs and enthusiastic musings about the Rincon scene captured a pivotal moment in surfing’s rise in California, just as it began the transition from an outlaw sport for rebels like Dick Metz to a mainstream activity backed by a just-forming wave of films, tele…

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Ruth Elder, actress and aviatrix, made an international splash in 1927 when she attempted the first trans-Atlantic flight by a female pilot just five months after Charles Lindbergh made his famous crossing. Though she fell just short of her aviation goal, the attempt made headlines around th…

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Although most legal matters today are directed to the county’s court facilities in Santa Barbara, court cases nearly 100 years ago were held in a small room beneath the city’s water tank building.

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Editor’s note: This wonderful compilation of Russell Cup history was originally published in Carpinteria Magazine in 2019. In celebration of last weekend’s victory by Carpinteria Warriors at the 101st Russell Cup, we proudly present these highlights of the meet’s storied past. 

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These exuberant surfers were not the first to surf famous Rincon Point but they were among the first to rediscover the point after World War II, riding the waves of the Queen of the Coast on their monster wooden boards.

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The Coast Highway at Linden Avenue looking west, circa 1947, epitomized small town charm. The water tank on the right held the town’s water supply and proclaimed, “Carpinteria—World’s Safest Beach.” Another sign with the same slogan can be seen just beyond the Standard Gasoline Station in th…

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The first welcome sign to Carpinteria was built around 1920 at the east end of town near Santa Claus Lane. Although the history of the name “La Carpinteria” (The Carpenter Shop) is not complete, the name was derived when the Spaniards witnessed the Chumash Indians making plank canoes. It mus…

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The 1930s was the decade of the Great Depression, FDR, The New Deal and the Dust Bowl. It would seem the least likely time to spawn outstanding athletes at a small school like Carpinteria High School, yet it was the era when some of the most accomplished and record-holding athletes competed …

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In 1939, Reginald Treloar Ogan composed a term paper titled “Mountain-Seashore, at your Door,” in which he wrote about the history of Carpinteria and described in detail the state of the 3,300-person town in the late 1930s. Born and raised in Carpinteria behind a long line of relatives with …

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In 1939, Reginald Treloar Ogan composed a term paper titled “Mountain-Seashore, at your Door,” in which he wrote about the history of Carpinteria and described in detail the state of the 3,300-person town in the late 1930s. Born and raised in Carpinteria behind a long line of relatives with …

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In 1939, Reginald Treloar Ogan composed a term paper titled “Mountain-Seashore, at your Door,” in which he wrote about the history of Carpinteria and described in detail the state of the 3,300-person town in the late 1930s. Born and raised in Carpinteria behind a long line of relatives with …

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Editor’s note: This nugget of Carpinteria history was originally published in the Summer 2016 edition of Carpinteria Magazine.

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A favorite quote of mine about “warriors” is credited to Heraclitus, a Greek philosopher circa 500 B.C. “Out of every one hundred men, 10 shouldn’t even be there, 80 are just targets, nine are the real fighters, and we are lucky to have them, for they make the battle. Ah, but the one, one is…

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Editor’s note: Portions of this nugget of Carpinteria history were written by David Griggs and originally published in the Summer 2007 edition of Carpinteria Magazine.

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Editor’s note: This nugget of Carpinteria history was written by Lea Boyd and originally published in the Summer 2016 edition of Carpinteria Magazine. 

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Editor’s note: Lima beans rose and fell. An asphalt mine and airports came and went. Corporate headquarters checked in then checked out. One draw to Carpinteria however, remains unchanged even as decades roll from far-off future to way-back past: the beaches. This nugget of Carpinteria histo…

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Editor’s note: Lima beans rose and fell. An asphalt mine and airports came and went. Corporate headquarters checked in then checked out. One draw to Carpinteria however, remains unchanged even as decades roll from far-off future to way-back past: the beaches. For the next two issues, CVN tak…

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Editor’s note: This nugget of Carpinteria history was written by David Griggs and originally published in the Winter 2012 edition of Carpinteria Magazine. 

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With this column, my year long journey of relating the history behind the pictures of Throwback Thursday comes to an end. In such a tough pandemic year of Covid-19, I have found a measure of peace and joy bringing these stories to you. I will leave you with one of my favorite memories – alth…

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Semi-pro baseball was immensely popular in Carpinteria in the 1930s.  It was also, initially, a segregated sport.  As the decade progressed, however, teams evolved, integrating year-by-year.  Sports have a way of breaking down racial barriers as the players get to know each other on and off …

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James and Pearl Slaybaugh started the process of creating a racetrack on their Carpinteria Bluffs property in 1946, and they had a great deal of help from the Carpinteria community to do it. Men like Ray Rollins, Joe Escareno Sr., Tom Ota and others pitched in to grade the track with their l…

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The Ayala Grapevine was planted by Joaquina de Lugo Ayala on the family farm in 1842 between what became Santa Monica Road and Cravens Lane. It was regarded as the world’s largest grapevine of its time.  It was also the most iconic “living thing” in the Carpinteria Valley, certainly the most…

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Carpinteria High School Warrior athletes copped league championships in football, track and baseball in the 1948–49 school year.  The Warriors were also top contenders in basketball and tennis. It was not uncommon for the student athletes to participate in three, or more, sports programs.  O…

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The Mountain View Inn, or Shepard’s Inn as it became widely known, was surely the biggest tourist attraction that the Carpinteria Valley had to offer at the turn of the 20th century. It was established circa 1890, but its roots go back to 1878.

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The first Mexican market in Carpinteria appears to have been opened by Tony Sanchez in 1927. Always a small grocery store, it was situated on the southeast corner of 7th Street and Holly. It was perfectly placed for its primary clientele, the Mexican immigrant population living west of Linde…

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Carpinteria’s growth as a sleepy agrarian village took a dramatic turn before the beginning of the 20th century with the establishment of asphalt mining operations. The men who arrived to work the mines increased the population by several hundred people. Modernization, such as it was, was sp…

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In the 1940s, dozens of young women spent their working days sorting and packing lemons at the local packinghouse. At that time lemon orchards covered Carpinteria Valley, and the avocado was just a glimmer in the valley’s eye. The business of lemons employed a significant portion of Carpinte…

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Lemonade stands are an American tradition. Every open air market and festival has one. The sight of kids setting up a stand along the roadside of a neighborhood to earn some spending income is familiar. In Carpinteria, of course, a lemonade stand was, and is, a natural. But, a roadside orang…

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With sports returning to television ever so gingerly, and many college and high school football conferences shut down because of Covid-19, sports diversions have jumped in to fill the void. A University of Southern California Trojan football website recently provided a series of articles hon…

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With the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1902, the decline of the Chinese presence in Carpinteria gave way to another Asian presence, the Japanese. Actually, another Asian group arose simultaneously, the Filipinos, but they tended to blend with the Mexican immigrants, sharing the Spanish language a…

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The Chinese presence in Carpinteria from a historical perspective is slight. There are so few recorded memories of Chinese residents as to make them seem almost invisible and inconsequential to Carpinteria’s development. But they were here and they contributed to daily life in the Valley. Ou…

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