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In “La Carpinteria” (1960), Georgia Stockton writes that early Carpinteria Valley residents lived in villages. She uses the term, villages, in the way that one might think of the Chumash or Canalino peoples living in the Valley predating California statehood. But Stockton’s usage is for the …

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Let’s review our Bancroft, shall we? California’s tome of 19th century history reports that the notorious outlaw, Joaquin Murrieta, was killed in 1853 by a posse of bounty hunters, led by Captain Harry Love, that was seeking a $1,000 governor’s reward from the California state legislature fo…

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AM Top 40 radio was at its apex in the 1960s. The wide variety of musical styles of the 1950s on AM radio had given way to the teen idols of the late ‘50s and early ‘60s to, perhaps, the inevitability of the Beatles and all the guitar bands that imitated their style.

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The Thunderbowl Race Track, built atop the Carpinteria Bluffs, was a Monday night weekly source of thrills and spills from 1947-57.  Opening day, Aug. 4, 1947, drew an overflow crowd of 6,600 in the grandstands, with 2,000 turned away. The oval was about a ¼ mile around with a pit stop area …

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In 1928, Violet Ray anti-knock gasoline was introduced by 3,500 dealerships into the Pacific Coast states from San Diego to Canada. Carpinteria had one of the dealerships under the proprietorship of Federico Gonzalez at the intersection of 7th Street and the Coast Highway (Carpinteria Avenue).

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By the 1930s, Carpinterians had a keen interest in their local baseball “nines” and the players attached to them. We are not talking about high school teams, now. No, we are talking about semi-pro ball clubs and the pride that was attached to them by communities, large and small.    

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In the fall of 1965, I was a senior at Carpinteria High School (CHS). We had an exciting football team, always a good thing for what was once a football-crazed town. And, there was a hotly contested election going on. Would Carpinteria be incorporated into a city, yes or no? The yes vote won…

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Some fruit box label collectors focus on collecting labels with children on them. Others focus on those depicting dogs. And others simply focus on great artwork. The Champ Brand out of Carpinteria has all three, and, as such, is a much sought after label. The fact that it is also a very rare…

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Nowadays, it seems rare to pick up an issue of the CVN that doesn’t have some comment, pro or con, about a proposed hotel near the train stop at Linden Avenue along 5th Street. Well, more than 130 years ago, Carpinterians were faced with a similar dilemna. The situation, however, was reverse…

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The U.S. Census comes around at the beginning of each new decade. In 2020, it kicks off on April 1, a Herculean and April Fool’s Day task rolled into one. Just how does one go about including everyone? Carpinteria was a good example of the undercount, and perhaps some creativity, when Arthur…

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A trickle of Mexican immigration to Carpinteria in the 1910s became a tidal wave in the 1920s, fueled by refugees of the Mexican Revolution, the effects of World War I taking farm boys off the ranches, and the ascent of citrus production causing a labor shortage.

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The Summerland School of 1890 was established on Whitney Avenue, the highest street on the hillside of Summerland.

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Two of the earliest schools in the Carpinteria Valley were the Rincon School, 1872, and the Summerland School, 1890. In traditional fashion, they had large bells to ring in the school day, recesses and other important alerts.

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Main School opened in 1938, two years after the Aliso School had opened as a de facto segregated school in Old Town Carpinteria. The photo depicted in this week’s Throwback Thursday appears to be from Main School’s grand opening. Pictures of Frank Wykoff, principal of both Main and Aliso Sch…

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The first movie theaters in Carpinteria were on Linden Avenue. The Carpinteria Valley News references one in 1916 at the Knights of Pythias Hall at the corner of Linden and what is now Ernest Wullbrandt Way, proprietor H. W. Campbell. In 1927, Oliver B. Prickett’s Carpinteria Theatre followe…

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Spook Brand produce was introduced to Carpinterians in the March 15, 1934 (Volume II, No. 4) edition of the Carpinteria Chronicle in a news brief titled “Hail, Lowly String Bean.”  

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Lee and Ruth Haggin were originally from Iowa, arriving in Carpinteria in 1950 in their retirement years. They appear to have followed their son, Vin, to California. Vin had captained a PT Boat in WWII and made a rather late-life decision, entering a California seminary after the war.

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Clark Durant Hubbard established the C. D. Hubbard Fruit Company in Carpinteria, California in 1912. He came to Carpinteria from San Fernando, where he started the Hubbard Association, and was one of the founding members of the California Fruit Growers Exchange which would eventually become …

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Joe Escareño, Jr., and his sister, Barbara, were cleaning out their aunt’s garage—Jessie Dominguez’s, who passed away recently—when they came across three near complete volumes of the Carpinteria Chronicle. These were Volume I (1933-34), Volume II (1934 only), and Volume VI (1938-39). Their …

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Serving the burgeoning wave of automobile owners, Rincon Garage was constructed in the early 1900s in the 900 block of Linden Avenue along what is now called Wullbrandt Way. The garage was owned by Walter Dowling and Frank Stewart, two entrepreneurs who benefited from Henry Ford’s success wi…

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This year’s Holiday Spirit Parade will be a new twist on an old classic, but the picture at right illustrates that the parade has undergone multiple revisions over time. This image, judged to be from the 1960s or 1970s, shows a marching band making its way along Carpinteria Avenue, blocking …

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Well deserving of the tree-lined road named in their honor, the Ogans are written into history as one of the original Carpinteria pioneering families. Their arrival stretches back to 1869, when James Simeral and Elizabeth Ogan led their ox teams into the valley. The couple had left their hom…

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The Rodriguez adobe gained enough fame around the turn of the 19th century to land on the front of a postcard, one of many cards in a series depicting scenes from around Carpinteria. Its celebrity came not from the craftsmanship or distinctiveness of the house itself, but from the massive ro…

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Editor’s note: The Carpinteria-Summerland Fire District’s long history in the valley is recorded in a booklet published in 1984 to honor the district’s 50th anniversary. Relying on information from this publication, Coastal View News is covering the district’s history in a series of “Throwba…

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Carpinteria Unified School District has suffered from declining enrollment over the last decade, but in the mid-20th century the school population was growing at a rapid clip. With Aliso and Main schools filled and plans to convert Main into a junior high school, a new elementary school was …

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In 1939, Carpinteria students moved out of a drafty, noisy tent school behind today’s Carpinteria Middle School and into a newly constructed, long-awaited elementary school on 8th Street. The school would eventually come to be known as Main School, a reference to its use as the main elementa…

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Built on the corner of Carpinteria and Maple avenues in 1890, J.B. Andrews’ grand home clearly reflected the good taste and refinement of its residents. Now the same home stands on the corner of Oak Avenue and 8th Street, where the color and ornate detailing has changed, but the home’s elega…

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A 50-foot whale stranded at Miramar beach made for just as much a spectacle way back when as it would now—though the fashion among looky-loos certainly has changed quite a bit.

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Located on the 4900 block of Carpinteria Avenue where Lemos Pet Supply and Crushcakes Cafe now stand, The Grocery Store provided Carpinterians with a friendly, local market in the 1970s. The store moved into the space after Safeway relocated to Linden Avenue (where Smart & Final now operates).

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Much has changed in Carpinteria Valley since this aerial photo was taken in 1966. The keen eye can locate a number of changes: the old lemon grove on the corner of Linden Avenue and Ogan Road—now a residential neighborhood; the agricultural fields across from St. Joseph Catholic Church—now t…

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Carpinterians continue to mourn the loss of Austins Homecenter and speculate on what might eventually fill the vacant space at 700 Linden Ave. Since the future of the space remains unclear, we can take a glimpse into the past instead.

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From left, Joe Wullbrandt and Bass Mackey pose in a 1923 Model T in front of Carpinteria High School (now Carpinteria Middle School) in 1937. Cars representing all eras of automobile history will be on display at the Rods and Roses Auto Show on Saturday, June 29, along Linden Avenue.

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Long before patio dining came to 5096 Carpinteria Ave., the property across from Maple Avenue housed the McLean family, including a solemn Baptist minister and his son, a real estate agent with a photography hobby that landed him a spot in Life Magazine.

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Looking back a century ago, Summerland’s oil boom resulted in a simultaneous boom in school enrollment. The one-room schoolhouse that opened in 1890 with 10  students was forced to hold 50 to 60 children in grades one through eight in the early 1900s.

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Though the asphaltum seeps along the Carpinteria coastline were used by the Chumash to caulk the seams of their tomols (plank canoes), it wasn’t until the late 1800s that the sticky substance was pulled from the earth in large quantities.

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The Linden Avenue of 1918 is a far cry from the Linden Avenue of 2019. Instead of the hustle and bustle of tourists and locals driving, bicycling and walking from here to there, we see a lone auto in the distance with a horse nearby. Instead of shops and restaurants rubbing elbows from Carpi…

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Memorial Day weekend officially kicks off tourist season in Carpinteria, and a packed State Beach can be counted on between now and Labor Day. As pictured back in 1923, a portion of today’s state park was the Fish Auto Camp, and much like today, campers from the hot interior of the state flo…

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Carpinteria holds a place, albeit a small place, in the history of flight. Our little town boasted the South Coast’s most popular airfield prior to the 1930s construction of Santa Barbara Airport on Goleta slough and pasture lands. Local air shows, like the one pictured above circa 1929, dre…

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