The Palms

When The Palms sprung up on the corner of Linden Avenue and 7th Street in 1912, it was the pride of Carpinteria. A Carpinteria Valley Chamber of Commerce publication highlights the brand new 18-room hotel’s “modern conveniences,” including hot and cold water in every room. 

When The Palms sprung up on the corner of Linden Avenue and 7th Street in 1912, it was the pride of Carpinteria. A Carpinteria Valley Chamber of Commerce publication highlights the brand new 18-room hotel’s “modern conveniences,” including hot and cold water in every room. 

Orginally the site housed the White Sulphur Springs Hotel which was destroyed by fire in 1894. The Palms building also housed the community’s first bank, Carpinteria Commercial and Savings Bank, and a post office in addition to the hotel. 

The Palms proved to be a popular stopover for travelers who came to town via the new Causeway built by the railroad. An advertisement for the establishment stated, “The rooms are perfectly ventilated, and contain hot and cold water from an artesian well on the grounds.”

The palm trees on Linden Avenue between 7th and 8th streets, planted in the late 1800s, are a desert fan palm, Washingtonia Filifera, sometimes call a California fan palm. In 1977, they were designated Carpinteria City Landmark #2.

As the palm trees grew the building underwent many changes. The poplularity of motor courts forced the hotel portion of the building to give way to the dining hall. 

For the last 70 years, the hotel-turned-restaurant has operated under the three generations of the Anderson family. Augusta and Beata Anderson owned it for several years before passing it down to their son Ken Anderson and his wife, Sue, in 1968. Their sons, Bill and Todd, took over when their parents retired in 1990.

In 1912, The Palms Hotel cost nearly $18,000 to construct. Earlier this month, the Anderson family listed the property for sale at $9.85 million. (See related story.)

 

 

To learn more about Carpinteria history, visit the Carpinteria Valley Museum of History’s website carpinteriahistoricalmuseum.org to access more articles on local history. To support the preservation of local history, consider becoming a member of the Carpinteria Historical Society. 

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